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SustainAbility Newsletter

SustainAbility Newsletter Archives

SustainAbility NewsletterA joint publication from Audubon Lifestyles and The International Sustainability Council


SustainAbility is a free quarterly newsletter co-produced by the International Sustainability Council and Audubon Lifestyles. Living a sustainable lifestyle requires each one of us to conduct our lives in such a way to encompass an awareness of Earth and its processes. Each of our choices require a consideration of the consequences, and the way that each decision affects the environment, society, and the economy. By minimizing our "ecological footprints" and the extent to which we create an environmental impact by living sustainably our hope is that we will preserve the earth for future generations. 

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SustainAbility Newsletter Archive Article (random)

Critter of the Season - Spring Peepers

By: Ronald G. Dodson | The Dodson Group LLC

Spring Peepers

Spring Peepers
Spring peepers are to the amphibian world what American robins are to the bird world. As their name implies, they begin emitting their familiar sleigh-bell-like chorus right around the beginning of spring.

Found in wooded areas and grassy lowlands near ponds and swamps in the central and eastern parts of Canada and the United States, these tiny, well-camouflaged amphibians are rarely seen. But the mid-March crescendo of nighttime whistles from amorous males is for many a sign that winter is over.

Spring peepers are tan or brown in color with dark lines that form a telltale X on their backs. They grow to about 1.5 inches in length, and have large toe pads for climbing, although they are more at home amid the loose debris of the forest floor.

They are nocturnal creatures, hiding from their many predators during the day and emerging at night to feed on such delicacies as beetles, ants, flies, and spiders.

They mate and lay their eggs in water and spend the rest of the year in the forest. In the winter, they hibernate under logs or behind loose bark on trees, waiting for the spring thaw and their chance to sing.


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References and Sources used in this issue of SustainAbility Newsletter Include:

Audubon Lifestyles
www.audubonlifestyles.org 
 
The International Sustainability Council
www.thesustainabilitycouncil.org 

Sustainability Campaign
sustainabilitycampaign.blogspot.com

Nature.com
www.enature.com

Golfpreserves
www.golfcourseproject.com

American Society of Golf Course Architects
www.asgca.org

The United States Golf Association (USGA)
www.usga.org

Sustainable Golf & Development
www.sustainablegolfdevelopment.com

Turf Feeding Systems
www.turffeeding.com

National Geographic
www.nationalgeographic.org


 

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A Coalition for Good - Spreading the Seeds of Sustainability

ISC-Audubon is a coalition of non-profit organizations and initiatives that include The International Sustainability Council (ISC), Audubon Lifestyles, Audubon Outdoors, Planit Green, Broadcast Audubon, and the Audubon Network for Sustainability. 

Funds generated through memberships and donations are used to provide fruit & vegetable seeds, wildflower seed mix, and wildlife feed & birdseed to urban and suburban communities around the world. These seeds are used by communities to establish fruit and vegetable gardens, bird and wildlife sanctuaries, and for the beautification of urban and suburban landscapes by creating flower and native plant gardens.

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